The Early and Late Works

Andrew Fisher Bunner’s early works were modeled after those by the Hudson River School.

A.F. Bunner, On the River.

A.F. Bunner, On the River.

The Hudson River School paintings “combined meticulous, factual description with romantic feeling for the beauty, grandeur, and nobility of American scenery”[1]. The typical paintings of the Hudson River School were landscapes of “undefiled scenery of the northeastern United States”[2] especially of New York State, where the Hudson River is located.

If we look at A.F. Bunner’s On the River, we can see the influence of the Hudson River School. The painting is of an undisclosed location, but is more than likely a scene

Thomas Doughty, In the Catskills, 1836, Oil on Canvas, Addison Gallery of American Art.

Thomas Doughty, In the Catskills, 1836, Oil on Canvas, Addison Gallery of American Art.

in the Catskills or Adirondack Mountains. The work is clam and peaceful with someone lazily rowing on the lake. The work is the celebration of the American landscape and how our landscape is vastly different from Europe. If you compare Bunner’s On the River with Thomas Doughty, 1793-1856[3], In The Catskills you can see how Bunner uses the Hudson River School’s use of grand and unaltered landscapes, smoky mountains in the distance, and the picture containing one person or suggestion of a person.

Andrew Fisher Bunner’s later works would expand on his early influence of the Hudson River School and his time in Europe and Venice. His later works were of marine landscapes and he frequented the East

A.F. Bunner, The Wreck.

A.F. Bunner, The Wreck.

Hamptons, a popular artist colony at the end of the 19th century[4]. As we seen in his work The Wreck, the painting is the love of the sea he must have developed from his time in Venice as well as the ideas of the vast landscape that is present in the Hudson River School works. Andrew Fisher Bunner’s early works would shape his Venice works and his Venice works

would shape his later works.


[1]“Hudson River School”  The Oxford Dictionary of American Art and Artists. Ann Lee Morgan, Oxford University Press, 2007. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.  University of Mary Washington.  8 December 2008  <http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t238.e646>

[2] “Hudson River School”  The Oxford Dictionary of American Art and Artists. Ann Lee Morgan, Oxford University Press, 2007. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.  University of Mary Washington.  8 December 2008  <http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t238.e646>

[3] Http://www.artstor.org/artstor/ViewImages?id=8CJGczI9NzldLS1WEDhzTnkrX3kidFl9eyA%3D&userId=hzRAcw%3D%3D

[4] Steve Shipp, American Art Colonies 1850-1930, Westport, CT.: Greenwood Press, 1996, pg. 256.

Next: The Evolution of His Venetian Works

Responses

Currently there is very little published on Bunner at all, but The Met is publishing a book on their paper collection (of which they have Bunner sketches) so more information might surface when that gets published.

I am seen an 1887 , signed A.F. Bunner river-land view, also signed T. Nouvain ( sp. ???)in the lower right hand corner, and referencing Klackner, 17 E. 17th St., NYC. Cannot make out the signature in the lower right hand corner of this approximate 30+ inch long by 14 inch or so height. Any ideas? The land portion of the scene includes a windmill.

I have a A F Bunner original engraving of a mother and daughter in front of a cottage on the River or ocean. The left side is his signature and the other side is Emil Milo? I was wondering if any others are around or any information . Thanks

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