Biography of A.F. Bunner

Andrew Fisher Bunner was born in New York City in 1841 and died in New York City in 1897[1]. He studied in the art school established by Thomas Seir Cummings[2] and took an antiques class at the National Academy from 1862-1863[3]. Andrew Fisher Bunner would exhibit at the National Academy, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Salmagundi Club. A.F. Bunner would visit Europe two times. His first trip was from 1871 until 1876 and he visited France, Holland, Germany, and Italy. His second trip, Bunner lived in Venice from 1883 until 1886. A.F. Bunner was highly praised in his life time. One critic in an 1882 article appearing in The Independent stated ““no American artist knows Venice better than Mr. Bunner and few can paint Venetian subjects as well. His palaces rise out of the water and are solid; his boats rise up from the water and float. He puts stability into his buildings ad grace and movement in his boats. In his color there is a certain airy quality, hard to define; but it is true to Venice”[4]. Andrew Fisher Bunner died in New York City in 1897 of unknown causes and his widow donated a large amount of his sketches to the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, DC.


[1] John Maylon, “Andrew Fisher Bunner”, http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/bunner_andrew_fisher.html (Accessed on 30 October 2008).

[2] David B. Dearinger,ed., Paintings and Scuplture in the Collection of the National Academy of Design, Volume I, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2004, pg. 312.

[3] David B. Dearinger,ed., Paintings and Scuplture in the Collection of the National Academy of Design, Volume I, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 2004, pg. 312.

[4]Fine Arts.:THE WATER-COLOR EXHIBITION”
The Independent … Devoted to the Consideration of Politics, Social and Economic Tendencies, History, Literature, and the Arts (1848-1921),  New York:Feb 9, 1882, Vol. 34,  Iss. 1732,  p. 7. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=?did=839298712&Fmt=10&clientId=4340&RQT=309&VName=HNP

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